DinosaurBreath

Dinosaur Lunch

I’m happy to report that after a more than 2-day schlep, I’ve arrived back at base camp in one piece. Unfortunately, I ran out of rations before I arrived and was forced to cook and eat a Nodosaur. Do you know what a Nodosaur is? It’s an armored plant-eater found here in Late Cretaceous North America. If you ever have the opportunity, I would advise avoiding having to eat Nodosaur at all costs. They’re mostly bone, the meat is especially tough, and it tastes like rubber covered in glue…on top of which, something’s not sitting well – I think it gave me indigestion. Then again, I’d rather be the one eating a dinosaur, then have it be the other way around! For more on the Nodosaur, read here. I’ll post from sometime in the Mesozoic again soon. – Dr. Williams

Making Return Trip to Base Camp

Dr. Williams again, posting from sometime in the Mesozoic. I’m currently making the two-day trek back to base camp, which has been extended thanks to a herd Alamosaurs. Do you know what an Alamosaurus is? It’s a considerably large Sauropod native to North America. They only ate plants, but were large enough that you wouldn’t find it especially fun if one happened to trod on you. Avoiding being caught under these things has extended my trip by several hours, compounded by my reliance on Dr. Greenspan’s maps which in retrospect should have been charted by someone who is not directionally challenged. For more on Alamosaurus, read here. Again, I must note that dinosaur’s breath in genuinely ghastly. I’ll update my log soon. – Dr. Williams

First Entry

This is Dr. Williams, posting my first log entry from sometime in the Mesozoic. I wanted to start getting my thoughts down before the next dinosaur attack, or spontaneous sing-along courtesy of Dr. Smuller. My rations are almost gone, and it’s a two-day hike back to base camp through territory crawling with Acrocanthosaurus. Do you know what an Acrocanthosaurus is? It’s a large theropod dinosaur, native to North America. There are plenty of them here in the Cretaceous. One of them bit Rogers the other day. He made it back to camp, but then a Hadrosaurus sat on him. For more on Acrocanthosaurus, read this, and for more on Hadrosaurus, try here. By the way, do you know the worst thing about dinosaurs? Their breath! I can smell it coming closer now! I’m setting out for base camp. Will update my log soon. – Dr. Williams

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